Types of Copper Tube Register ico-categories ico-open ico-close ico-supplier ico-white-paper-case-study ico-product ico-cad

Copper tubes are composed of 99.9% pure copper and small quantities of alloying elements in accordance with standards published by ASTM. They are available in both hard and soft tempers, the latter meaning that the tube has been annealed to soften it. Hard tubing is joined by capillary fittings. Soft tubing can be joined in a variety of additional ways, including compression fittings and flaring. Both are produced as seamless constructions. Copper tubes are used in plumbing, HVAC, refrigeration, medical-gas delivery, compressed-air systems, and cryogenic systems. In addition to plain copper tubes, tubes are available in specialty alloys. There is some inconsistency in the terminology for copper tubes. When the product is formed into coils, it is sometimes referred to as copper tubing owing to the increase in flexibility and the ability to bend the material more readily. But that distinction is not by any means a universally practiced or accepted one. In addition, some of the rigid wall straight lengths of copper tube are sometimes referred to as copper pipe. The use of these terms may vary from supplier to supplier. These tubes are alike except for differences in wall thickness,...

Boosted Coyote Pt 4: The Livernois Long Block Hits the Dyno

This series has been one of redemption. Going from a practically unsalvageable, blown-up stock Coyote engine, to a full Race-Series long-block from Livernois Motorsports and Engineering has been an exciting process. We’ve explained the ideas and theories behind the components used in the build, but the time for talk is over. Now, it’s time to put all the shiny new parts to the test, to see what they are truly capable of on the dyno. First, we have to get the new long-block into the car. Thankfully, since there are no exterior physical differences between the OEM engine and the aftermarket powerhouse from Livernois, installation should be a simple replacement. In case you haven’t been following the series, in Part Two, Livernois built us one of their stock-displacement Race-Series short-blocks. Using an OEM block, Darton sleeves were added, along with an OEM crankshaft. Livernois then installed a set of its own forged Powerstorm connecting rods and custom Powerstorm pistons. Then, in Part Three, the short-block was topped off with a set of Livernois Race Series Coyote cylinder heads, which received the full CNC treatment on the intake and exhaust ports, as well as the combustion ...