Editor’s note: In the original article, Michael Rogers intended to say “early evolutionary ancestors” instead of Neanderthals when speaking about the agricultural revolution. As well, he intended to say there’s no anthropological evidence of Type 2 diabetes, not Type 1. All changes have been made in his quotes.  Beyond Meat burgers have defied expectations of carnivores and herbivores alike. The patty has duped meat-eaters and brought variety to the sometimes protein-scarce diets of vegetarians and vegans. It’s now even launched in Tim Hortons — Canada’s quintessential coffee chain — after a long promotional run in A&W restaurants. As this meat alternative seemingly makes its way into our everyday lives — it’s also available for purchase in grocery stores — some health experts question whether plant-based burgers are actually good for us. While some people are switching to Beyond Meat for environmental and ethical reasons, dietitians like Amanda Lapidus and Abby Langer say there is cause for worry about the “health halo” being placed on these meat alternatives. “The Beyond Meat burger is technically a processed food. We know that diets higher in processed foods are linked to...