The post popped up in select Instagram feeds shortly before the election in 2016. Its photo

The post popped up in select Instagram feeds shortly before the election in 2016. Its photo depicted an anonymous black-clad woman on an airport tarmac, crying over a metal casket covered in an American flag. “Killary Clinton will never understand what it feels like to lose the person you love for the sake of your country,” the caption began. “Honoring the high cost paid by so many families to protect our freedom. Buy a T-shirt—help a veteran.” In the world of military memes, it was a pretty standard sponsored post by the popular american.veterans Instagram account, targeted at members of online groups for the United States Army Reserve, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, Concerned Veterans for America, and a fan page for Chris Kyle of American Sniper fame. The apparel sales were real, but the post was not concocted by a veteran—not a United States veteran, at least. The account that posted it was controlled by Russia’s Internet Research Agency; for just over 3,000 rubles (about $50), its “Killary” post was targeted to nearly 18,000 mostly-veteran Instagram users; at least 500 clicked through to the third-party site selling “MilVet” apparel. “Who profits from sales of Mil...

What’s behind a 30% jump in whistleblower complaints at Nifty companies?

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